Teaching Introduction to Business

Bovee and Thill offer innovative ideas and resources for teaching introduction to business, so instructors can spend less time preparing and more time teaching.

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"By the time you hit 40, rationalizing away your bad money management habits starts to have a serious impact on your financial future (not to mention age you)."  . .

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"When faced with the decision of choosing between a job you love and a job that pays well, remember this: You can have your cake and eat it too.

"The second annual list of the best employers in America by PayScale and Business Insider evaluates companies by both pay and happiness." . . .

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"From your parents telling you not to cross your eyes because they’ll stay that way and “early to bed, early to rise . . .” to taking Airborne or high doses of Vitamin C will cure a cold, there’s no shortage of myths in the world. And there’s no shortage of reasons why."

"Only one thing’s for sure: myths are stubbornly persistent because we keep them alive. Here are five business myths that live on for no rational reason. They’re not just annoying; they’re misleading and potentially damaging to a person's career."


"When now co-CEO Monty Moran was surveying Chipotle's 1,500 restaurants, he found a fascinating consistency: the best-performing ones all had a manager who had come up from the crew level. " . . .


"Some companies just can’t make their customers happy, and many of the companies are the kind that customers find it hardest to escape." . . .

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If you have the responsibility of preparing students for the challenges they'll face in tomorrow's tough and uncertain business environment, turn to the most efficient introduction to business textbook on the market—Business in Action.

Business in Action offers instructors and students a much-needed alternative to texts that are either overstuffed and overwhelming or so skimpy that they compromise essential coverage. With the comprehensive 20-chapter coverage that is up to 20 percent shorter than other texts, Business in Action sets the standard in high-productivity learning.

Throughout Business in Action, there is no filler and no fluff, and the examples were chosen carefully to illustrate important points without overloading the text. We invite you to do side-by-side comparisons with any other business text to see which one will make the best use of your students' time and energy for studying.

Each chapter is divided into six concise segments, each with its own Learning Objective. Each segment focuses on the most essential concepts and terminology to help students achieve that particular objective before moving on. The consistent structure simplifies course planning and class time allocation for instructors, and it helps students organize their reading, review, and test preparation.

Each chapter segment concludes with a comprehensive Checkpoint that helps students review and reinforce what they've learned in manageable doses, rather than reviewing an entire chapter at once. With this approach, each learning objective is addressed as a mini-chapter within the chapter, which helps students absorb new concepts in small, carefully metered segments and get confirmation before moving on to the next segment.

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"It has never been more challenging for a brick-and-mortar retail merchant to succeed in an enduring way," Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz said.

'We are witness to a seismic change in consumer behavior,' said Schultz. And that seismic change is linked to technology."

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"Alexander Graham Bell wanted to sell his patents and technology for the telephone to Western Union, which was the leading telegraph company at the time. Bell’s price: $100,000. Western Union thought it was laughable.

Venture capitalist Ben Horowitz has a big post on why people should be optimistic about technology companies

 In it, he talks about how some of the most fundamental products in our lives today were laughed at by outsiders when they were first introduced. 

He also talks about how big companies try to kill innovation."

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"The Airbus A380 is one of the most incredible planes flying today, even judged by size alone.

It usually seats around 500 passengers, but can hold as many as 853 — making it the largest passenger aircraft on the planet."

See how it's manufactured.

 

 

 


"It's not every day you'll see CEOs getting their hands dirty, working side by side with the rank-an-file.

But for four years, the CBS show "Undercover Boss" has given viewers that chance, showing 60 top executives doing regular jobs, from flipping hamburgers to installing alarm systems.

The show, however, has attracted its fair share of skepticism: . . ."

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